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Interactive Map for Airport WiFi Passwords Around the World

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airport wifi passwords map Interactive Map for Airport WiFi Passwords Around the World

 

Travel blogger and computer security engineer Anil Polat created an interactive Google Map of WiFi passwords for airports and airport lounges around the world.

Embedded below, the regularly updated map is expandable and zoomable. By clicking on the little airplane icon you can see the corresponding airport/lounge’s WiFi login/password.

For those interested in an offline version, the map is available for purchase on iOS and Android.

If you or someone you know is a frequent flyer, share this handy map with them!

[Fox Nomad via Mashable]

 

 

 

 





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I want to search gif to xls now and see what happens.
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More than 30% of U.S. children first use a mobile device while in diapers, says American Academy of Pediatrics

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Updated parental guidelines are needed to help make informed decisions about the use of technology by children, says the American Academy of Pediatrics, as it revealed that more than 30% of U.S. children first use a mobile device while still in diapers. The AAP says that “digital life begins at a young age, and so must parental guidance.”

The Academy says that its existing policy statement was actually drafted before the first iPad was launched. A two-day symposium held earlier this year generated twelve key messages, based not just on limiting screen time but also on distinguishinghelpful from harmful use of technology … 

A number of key messages for parents emerged from the AAP Growing Up Digital: Media Research Symposium. Among them is that family participation with media facilitates social interactions and learning. Parents should play a video game with their kids, and always co-view with infants and toddlers.

The AAP said that the quality of the content was more important than either the medium or the amount of time spent in front of a screen. If the content was educational, it didn’t matter whether the format was a paper book or an app viewed on a tablet. It did, however, say that limiting screen time was still important – and not just for kids.

Attentive parenting requires face time away from screens.

The full list of messages to parents can be found below.

Photo: Huffington Post

The following key messages for parents emerged:

  • Media is just another environment. Children do the same things they have always done, only virtually. Like any environment, media can have positive and negative effects.
  • Parenting has not changed. The same parenting rules apply to your children’s real and virtual environments. Play with them. Set limits; kids need and expect them. Teach kindness. Be involved. Know their friends and where they are going with them.
  • Role modeling is critical. Limit your own media use, and model online etiquette. Attentive parenting requires face time away from screens.
  • We learn from each other. Neuroscience research shows that very young children learn best via two-way communication. “Talk time” between caregiver and child remains critical for language development. Passive video presentations do not lead to language learning in infants and young toddlers. The more media engender live interactions, the more educational value they may hold (e.g., a toddler chatting by video with a parent who is traveling). Optimal educational media opportunities begin after age 2, when media may play a role in bridging the learning achievement gap.
  • Content matters. The quality of content is more important than the platform or time spent with media. Prioritize how your child spends his time rather than just setting a timer.
  • Curation helps. More than 80,000 apps are labeled as educational, but little research validates their quality (Hirsh-Pasek KPsych Science2015;16:3-34Google Scholar). An interactive product requires more than “pushing and swiping” to teach. Look to organizations like Common Sense Media (www.commonsensemedia.org) that review age-appropriate apps, games and programs.
  • Co-engagement counts. Family participation with media facilitates social interactions and learning. Play a video game with your kids. Your perspective influences how your children understand their media experience. For infants and toddlers, co-viewing is essential.
  • Playtime is important. Unstructured playtime stimulates creativity. Prioritize daily unplugged playtime, especially for the very young.
  • Set limits. Tech use, like all other activities, should have reasonable limits. Does your child’s technology use help or hinder participation in other activities?
  • It’s OK for your teen to be online. Online relationships are integral to adolescent development. Social media can support identity formation. Teach your teen appropriate behaviors that apply in both the real and online worlds. Ask teens to demonstrate what they are doing online to help you understand both content and context.
  • Create tech-free zones. Preserve family mealtime. Recharge devices overnight outside your child’s bedroom. These actions encourage family time, healthier eating habits and healthier sleep.
  • Kids will be kids. Kids will make mistakes using media. These can be teachable moments if handled with empathy. Certain aberrations, however, such as sexting or posting self-harm images, signal a need to assess youths for other risk-taking behaviors.

Digital life begins at a young age, and so must parental guidance. Children who are “growing up digital” should learn healthy concepts of digital citizenship.


Filed under: iOS Devices, Mac, Tech Industry Tagged: American Academy of Pediatrics, children, Education, education apps, Kids, Toddlers

Visit 9to5Mac to find more special coverage of iOS Devices, Tech Industry, and Mac.

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One of these is Europa, the rest are frying pans

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Remove Dents from Wood with an Iron

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how to remove a dent from wood with an iron (6)

 

Trev25 at Instructables.com has a great step-by-step guide for getting dents out of wood using an iron. Judging from the 100+ comments the life hack is a hit and really works! You can find a summary below.

Be sure to check out the original post to read all the tips and feedback from the Instructables community.

 

 

What you’ll need: An iron, some water and a shop towel
(an old t-shirt or rag also works!)

 

how to remove a dent from wood with an iron (1)

 

Put a dab of water on the affected area,
just enough to cover the dent.

 

how to remove a dent from wood with an iron (5)

 

Now cover the affected area with your towel/rag.

 

how to remove a dent from wood with an iron (3)

 

Set your iron to the highest/hottest setting and make small movements (back and forth and in circles) until towel is dry.

 

how to remove a dent from wood with an iron (7)

 

The wood should absorb the water and expand back
to its original position. Repeat process as needed.

 

how to remove a dent from wood with an iron (2)

 

BAM!
For unfinished pieces you can lightly
sandpaper the area to smooth things out.

 

how to remove a dent from wood with an iron (4)

 

 

 

If you enjoyed this post, the Sifter
highly recommends:

 

 

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diy shelves with glow in the dark resin inlay 16 Remove Dents from Wood with an Iron

 

 

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This Guy Rode Over 200,000 km and Took a 360 Panorama Everywhere He Went

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In a once-in-a-lifetime journey that lasted 600 days, Alex Chacon rode a motorcycle through 36 countries, logging an insane 202,690 km in the process. Equipped with a GoPro, Alex took a 360 panorama of everywhere he went, editing the footage into one amazing video that will cause wanderlust for many.

You can find hundreds of photos along with a recap of his entire journey on The Modern Motorcycle Diaries.

 

see more videos button This Guy Rode Over 200,000 km and Took a 360 Panorama Everywhere He Went

twistedsifter on facebook This Guy Rode Over 200,000 km and Took a 360 Panorama Everywhere He Went

 

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